Tuesday, December 22, 2009

The RENAISSANCE Project

Filipino comic book artists unite for heroic cause
By John Geddes, USA TODAY

http://www.usatoday.com/life/comics/2009-12-14-filipino-artists-unite_N.htm



UPDATE : EVENT HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO FEB.20,2010 AT THE MEGATRADE HALL

Whilce recently did an interview with USA TODAY about the Renaissance project / event :

Whilce said, "We're working on an event right now called Renaissance. It's a charity auction ... that will provide money to some of these artists who have fallen on tough times. I got the top Filipino artists together to create pieces for this auction. Their mission was to create a Filipino superhero. I told them, 'You're world-class artists, make a character that kids in the Philippines can look up to, can be inspired by.' I want these kids to see artists creating heroes that look like them and that live and interact in local places that they recognize. It's a key part of establishing that sense of history, pride and legacy. If we can do that while providing support for artists in need, then we're accomplishing two worthy goals at the same time."

READ THE COMPLETE INTERVIEW AT:
http://www.usatoday.com/life/comics/2009-12-14-filipino-artists-unite_N.htm

Sunday, December 20, 2009

Manix Abrera interview in SUNDAY INQUIRER MAGAZINE

The Rise of Manix
By Ruel S. De Vera

Philippine Daily Inquirer, 12/19/2009



IT appears to be just another graphic novel, its matte black cover peppered with what seem to be teardrops, each of them containing a falling humanoid figure – save one. The biggest drop carries the book’s title: “12.” There is no author’s name; there isn’t anything else except the darkness. And it gets weirder from that point on.

As the pages flip past, the reader is greeted by exactly 12 tales featuring these tiny figures, ranging from bizarre love to existentialism to metahumanity to cosmic awareness to, well, just plain oddness. All these unfold on colored, glossy pages but without a single word. It’s unlike any Filipino comic book ever made.

Welcome to the brave new world of Filipino comics, courtesy of Manuel Luis “Manix” Abrera, a world where the panels are constantly shifting and the universe is continually swirling.

READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE AT:
http://showbizandstyle.inquirer.net/sim/sim/view/20091219-242931/The_Rise_of_Manix

Sunday, December 13, 2009

UNDERPASS interview in Manila Bulletin



A pedestrian walkway.
A SIM card.
A beauty clinic.

These and other ordinary things become more than what they seem in “Underpass”, a full-color graphic novel recently launched by Summit Media.

“Underpass” brings together such established names in the local comic book industry like Gerry Alanguilan, David Hontiveros, Oliver Pulumbarit, Ian Sta. Maria, Budjette Tan, and Kajo Baldisimo, who come up with urban legend for a new generation in stories like “The Sim”, “Katumbas”, “Judas Kiss”, and “The Clinic”.

“In a strange and twisted way, I hope it’ll bring back some wonder and sense of the fantastic in their lives,” Tan adds. “Technology has made the stuff of science fiction a reality. It’s not fantastic anymore. It’s just common place. We don’t see haunted-looking houses these days. We are surrounded by condos and high rises. Maybe we can take such things and make them mysterious.”


READ THE COMPLETE INTERVIEW AT:
http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/233564/a-sense-fantastic

Wednesday, December 02, 2009

A review of "The First One Hundred Years of Philippine Komiks and Cartoons"

Finally, a resource book on Pinoy komiks and cartoons
By Lynett Villariba
Philippine Daily Inquirer


American scholar and ‘komiks’ aficionado John Lent writes a book that is a loving paean to a dying art form
ENTHUSIASTS HAVE NOTED the lack of reference material on the history of Philippine komiks. Finally, a book that fills up that lack: “The First One Hundred Years of Philippine Komiks and Cartoons,” by John A. Lent (10”x11,” 160 full-color pages).

The book seeks to trace the birth, blossoming, decline and rebirth of comics and cartoons in the country—and it accomplishes even more. It showcases the depth of komiks talents the country has produced—from visual artists Nestor Redondo, Francisco V. Coching, Alex NiƱo, Alfredo Alcala, Nonoy Marcelo, Larry Alcala, to comics novelists Mars Ravelo and Pablo S. Gomez.

Published by Boboy Yonzon, “The First One Hundred Years of Philippine Komiks and Cartoons” is written by noted world-comics historian and journalism scholar John A. Lent, with contributing authors Beth Chionglo, Aileen Casis, Glady Gimena, Orvy Jundis, Joy Del Mundo and Boboy Yonzon.

READ THE COMPLETE REVIEW AT:
http://lifestyle.inquirer.net/artsandbooks/artsandbooks/view/20091130-239220/Finally,__a_resource_book__on_Pinoy_komiks_and_cartoons


US author’s book on ‘komiks’ launched at RP cartoon fest
By Oliver Pulumbarit
Philippine Daily Inquirer

Some of the most popular local feature films and teleseryes originally started out as komiks serials. The works of Pinoy comics luminaries were exhibited at the first Philippine International Cartoon, Comics, and Animation (Picca) Festival held recently at SM Megamall and other venues.

Various aspects of the art forms were discussed in talks, book launches, film showings and other activities. Picca founder Boboy Yonzon expounded on the importance of the event:

“We would like to give a forum for comics artists, a channel or watershed venue for them and the cartoonists. This is an advocacy intended to energize what is supposed to be a dying craft or industry. There are many talented Filipino creators; we just have to make people aware of what we can offer.”

READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE AT:
http://showbizandstyle.inquirer.net/entertainment/entertainment/view/20091201-239590/US-authors-book-on--komiks-launched-at-RP-cartoon-fest

Manix's "12" reviewed in Inquirer

Manix Abrera’s silent comic book
By Adjani Guerrero Arumpac
Philippine Daily Inquirer



TO FIND HER MOTHER, the lost girl places her eyes on a red balloon. She lets it fly. The balloon soars to the skies, and then the wide universe. On earth, the girl without eyes opens her mouth in awe at things she never should have seen.

Rude awakenings seem to be Manix Abrera’s preoccupation in his newest comic book, “12.” This collection of 12 stories is reminiscent of Yoshihiro Tatsumi’s 1930s strips in their grounded absurdity and nagging, intense feeling of loneliness.


READ THE COMPLETE REVIEW AT:
http://lifestyle.inquirer.net/artsandbooks/artsandbooks/view/20091130-239211/Manix-Abreras-silent-comic-book

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